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Paracord Belt: A Practical Survival Item

Bill Watson from Ridgerunner Belts contacted me about a month ago. He wanted to know if I’d be interested in a free paracord belt to review here on my blog.

After looking at his product photos, I told him that, yes, I would be interested.

So Bill had me to go his website and provide instructions for my belt. I’m terrible picking colors, so I decided on two neutral colors: black and “coyote brown.” I figured black and brown would match most of my clothes.

Paracord Belt - The Whole BeltAfter I placed my order, I was pleasantly surprised to receive my new paracord belt in the mail about one week later.

As you can see in the picture, the belt is well made. It’s woven tightly and feels sturdy.

In the close-up picture below, you can see more detail in the belt.

Bill also threw in a matching survival bracelet.

Turns out, I actually wear the bracelet more often than I wear the belt. I don’t use belts too often in the summer time when I’m wearing shorts. I will probably wear it more in the fall and winter when I wear jeans.

I also plan to wear it when I go camping this weekend.

If you’d like a custom-made paracord belt for yourself… or if you’d like to order one as a gift for somebody you love… you can do so at Bill’s website, RidgeRunnerBelts.com.

Paracord Belt - Close UpYou get to choose up to three colors for your belt. I chose two colors. Bill’s got pictures of one-color, two-color, and three-color belts on his site to help you.

Why get a paracord belt? A few reasons:

  • You can use a pocket knife to cut into your belt (near the buckle) to easily access 50+ feet of paracord.
  • Paracord is tested up to 550 pounds tensile strength, so it can hold a lot of weight. Very useful for stringing up a makeshift tent… securing yourself to an object… or hauling/towing something heavy.
  • There are dozens of uses for paracord. Use it to replace a broken shoelace. Lash sticks together to make a fishing spear or lash logs together to make a makeshift raft. Tie yourself to your hiking partner if you get stuck in a blizzard and don’t want to become separated.

Naturally, if you’re wearing a paracord belt and you’re carrying a simple pocket knife… and you’re faced with a true survival situation… the paracord in your belt and bracelet could become a real lifesaver.

If you’re interested in ordering a belt of your own, go to Ridge Runner Belts and follow the ordering instructions. (You actually place your order using the “Request Information” form, then pay separately by check or PayPal.)

Don’t be scared. Be prepared.
-Survival Joe

P.S. Full disclosure: I received a free belt and bracelet in consideration of this product review.

P.P.S. Ridge Runner now makes paracord rifle slings in addition to bracelets and belts.

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This post was written by Survival Joe on Wednesday, May 30, 2012 and tagged as: , , , ,